Canadian Marketing Association Summit 2012 in Review (Day #1)

A couple of weeks ago I had the opportunity to attend the 2012 Canadian Marketing Association Summit. The annual two day event was packed full of insights and information from true visionaries, with content focussed on this year’s theme of “connections” – how connections with consumers, with customers and with each other are made, maintained, and measured.

I thought I would share a brief recap of the sessions I attended, inspired by a similar post Michael Zipursky from FreshGigs.ca wrote summarizing the recent VISION marketing conference hosted by the British Columbia Chapter of the American Marketing Association.

Key learnings from the sessions on the first day of the conference are below. Click here to read a review of the sessions for day #2.

 

Sir Ken Robinson
“Leading a Culture of Innovation”

 

Sir Ken Robinson, PhD, is an internationally recognized leader in the development of education, creativity and innovation. He is also one of the world’s leading speakers with a profound impact on audiences everywhere. Sir Ken Robinson spoke about leading a culture of innovation – his talk was both humorous and inspiring.

Some key points from Sir Ken’s talk:

  • To be creative, we must actually DO something.
  • A systematic approach to innovation is needed – it must be engrained in a company’s culture.
  • Education systems are locked in the past (see Sir Ken Robinson’s TED Talk on how schools kill creativity).
  • The transformation of technologies is unpredictable.
    • Apple’s App Store necessitated development of advanced credit card processing technology.
    • Twitter’s original purpose was to enable people to communicate what they’re currently doing to a small group.
  • Everyone has creative capacities – companies that are innovative understand this.
  • Most organizations are built on command and control – if you want innovation, you must think differently.
  • Innovative companies focus on “climate control” as opposed to “total control” to cultivate possibilities and creative capacity.
  • Companies should focus on developing the talents of everyone, rewarding creativity.
  • Create an innovative culture through habits and habitat – deliberately and systematically.
  • Innovative companies mentioned by Sir Ken Robinson included IDEO, Zappos and IBM.

Twitter: @sirkenrobinson


Bryan Pearson
“The Loyalty Leap: Turning Customer Information into Customer Loyalty”

Bryan Pearson, President and CEO of LoyaltyOne, is an internationally recognized expert and author in the fields of enterprise loyalty and coalition marketing with more than two decades experience developing meaningful customer relationships for some of the world’s leading companies. He is also the author of The Loyalty Leap – an insightful book that I just finished reading.

Some key points from Bryan’s talk:

  • Companies can’t cost cut their way to growth; they must connect differently with customers.
  • There are three ways companies compete
    • On efficiency (Walmart)
    • On product (Apple)
    • On customer intimacy (through which we can all win)
  • Media is fragmented, consumers encounter 5,000 to 10,000 brand messages daily.
  • Companies now have an opportunity to capture oceans of data.
  • Need to focus on moving from product centricity to customer centricity (see blog post I wrote on customer-centricity).
  • The three R’s – relevance, recognition and reward.
  • Through data integration, companies need to deliver better on relevance.
  • Several dimensions to relevance – spatial (location), temporal (event based), individual and cultural.
  • Companies can tailor offers taking the dimensions of relevance into account.
  • Shell leveraged customer data from Air Miles to provide customer offers during a period in which their preferred gas stations were closed for renovation – sales actually increased.
  • Nike is great example of building loyalty without control of channel, through Nike+ apps.
  • By being customer-centric at heart, companies have an opportunity to become relevant.
  • Companies must leverage data collected, but it’s key to be transparent to build trust – always use data in best interest of customer.

 

 

Twitter: @pearson4loyalty


David Shing
“What’s Next for Media?”

David Shing is the Digital Prophet for AOL and recently was the head of Media and Marketing for AOL Europe before relocating to New York in 2011. He literally gave the most fast-paced, high tempo presentation I’ve ever seen – sharing insights on the digital revolution, trends he sees unfolding, and how to keep up with the rapidly changing landscape.

Some key points from David’s talk:

  • Fragmentation is accelerating – portals, search, blogs, aggregators, feeds, social networks.
  • Digital content should entertain, inform and provide utility.
  • Attention is the new currency and simplicity is the ultimate sophistication.
  • Nike+ FuelBand is a great example of combining physical, digital and social.
  • Location, location, location – social identity broadcasting (when, where and what) is accelerating.
  • People are getting overwhelmed – defriend and unfollow will be a trend.
  • It’s not about size, it’s about influence.
  • Companies need to create experiences authentic to the environment.
  • Generic advertising must evolve to influence marketing.
  • 0.02% is now the average display/banner ad click through rate.
  • As economic woes continue, consumers will appreciate small acts of kindness – even branded ones.
  • Cause marketing is now 3rd largest for sponsorship dollars.
  • What’s next?  Conversations, not campaigns. Conversations, not chatter.
  • Online videos are becoming increasingly prominent.
  • Companies must be an engine of difference to consumers
    • Foster social utility – it’s like like water, electricity
    • Encourage a remix culture
    • Find the right people
    • Harness pre-existing communities
    • Embrace co-creation, and fast fail foundation

Twitter: @shingy


Jim Lecinski
“ZMOT – Winning the Zero Moment of Truth”

 

Jim Lecinski is the Vice President, U.S. Sales for Google, and he leads Google’s advertising business nationally. His focus is helping major marketers and media agency partners in the Consumer Packaged Goods, Pharmacy & Healthcare, Food/Beverage/Restaurant, Branded Apparel & Durables and Media & Entertainment industries adapt to the new digital marketing realities.

Some key points from Jim’s talk:

  • The traditional mental model of marketing: stimulus -> first moment of truth (in store, point of decision) -> second moment of truth (experience product/service).
  • Recession and technology have changed the model of building brands.
  • A new moment of truth has arisen – online research.
  • Consider:
    • 83% of people regularly rely on review sites when making buying decisions.
    • 93% of Canadian online population conducts research online.
    • 47% of Canadian online population go to product review site.
    • 58% of people indicate online research influenced buying decision “a lot”.
  • TV is still an important stimulus – it prompts more action at ZMOT.
  • With mobile, ZMOT can happen at point of purchase in store.
  • Local searches, coupon searches are growing.
  • The number of sources customers use for information is increasing significantly.
  • How to win the zero moment of truth?
    • Put someone in charge.
    • Find the zero moments in your category.
    • Answer question’s people are asking you (research on Google).
    • Optimize for mobile.
    • Be fast – keep on top of trends and opportunities.
    • Win with video.

Twitter: @jimlecinski


Brent Choi and Andrew Simon
“Maximizing Your ROC – Return on Creativity. How to make innovate thinking work harder for your company.”

 

Brent Choi, Chief Creative Director at Cundari Group, and Andrew Simon, Partner and Chief Creative Officer at Blammo Worldwide, discussed creativity and shared some examples of innovative companies that foster a creative workplace culture.

Some key points from their talk:

  • Creativity is a discipline, a commitment and an investment.
  • Google does it well.
    • Employees allowed to spend 20% of their workweek on special projects not related to their normal workload.
    • Creativity is considered a collective pursuit.
    • Failure is fine – employees are encouraged to openly talk about failures.
    • Google has a vending machine for computer parts.
    • Free lunch offered, encouraging people from different areas of company to talk.
  • General Mills “Bold Experiments” strategy rewards brave decision making.
    • Cited Cheech and Chong promotion of Fibre One brownie.
  • Procter and Gamble has developed a “playground” property which employees can make use of, to incubate ideas while also escaping from the office.
  • To think creatively, companies need to break free and think differently.
  • Bring together people from different disciplines, with different ideas and perspectives.
  • Successful companies are ones that embrace creativity.

Twitter: @brentchoi, @andrewlsimon


Adam Froman
“The Age of Intelligence: From Insight to Action by Harnessing the Voice of the Customer”

Adam Froman, Founder and CEO of Delvinia, believes that digital platforms can be used to create meaningful, human connections between companies and their customers. His talk focussed on how companies can capture attitudes and behaviours of their customers to develop customer-driven strategies and improve customer experiences.

Some key points from Adam’s talk:

  • Much has changed over the last few years, but what hasn’t changed – need to get messages out to consumers, need to collect feedback to derive insights.
  • Voice of the customer has emerged, opportunity to collect feedback leveraging technology and attain 360 view of the customer in real time.
  • Three parts:
    • Ask customers for their opinion and perspective in real time.
    • Listen to what customers are saying about your brand.
    • Observe behaviour to understand how to enhance customer experience.
  • Ask:
    • Companies can use a variety of methods to attain opinions, including surveys, online communities, forums.
    • Three key motivators, from customer perspective – trust, privacy and reciprocity.
    • Opportunity to leverage innovative methods and platforms in collecting data (crowdsourcing cited as example),
  • Listen:
    • Leverage social media monitoring platforms and analytics.
    • Understand community participation (1% are heavy contributors, 9% are somewhat active, 90% are lurkers).
  • Observe:
    • Companies must integrate data to enhance decision making, understand behaviour and attain actionable insights.
    • Tableau and Clarabridge are companies that enable integration of CRM and social data in one place.
  • Five voice of customer key success factors:
    • Accept every customer is digital and they control the conversation.
    • Don’t let technology lead.
    • Think big data and integration of data.
    • Voice of the customer requires collaboration.
    • Voice of the customer is a customer experience.

5 Things to Thank Steve For

Perhaps it’s fitting that I’m writing this on Thanksgiving, a great time to pause, reflect, and give thanks to those who have had a significant impact on my life. Last Wednesday the world lost a true visionary in Steve Jobs. Much has been written, and much has been said, about the overwhelming impact and contribution that Jobs has made; some people have alluded to Jobs as being the Einstein of our generation, and I have a hard time disagreeing with that comparison.

Here are five personal things that I would like to thank Steve for:

  1. Inspiring me. Steve’s many accomplishments, and the manner in which he achieved them, speak volumes.
  2. Helping me to maintain and build relationships with friends. Sure, I use platforms like Facebook and Twitter, but it’s through Apple products that I access them.
  3. Adding an element of fun to my runs. I bought an iPod Nano years ago, and have since graduated to using my iPhone. The Nike+ GPS app is definitely one of my favourites.
  4. Teaching me. Steve Jobs built Apple into a brand that is unlike any other – one that cultivates passion and emotion, and arguably has the most loyal customer base in the world.
  5. Reminding me that nobody is perfect. Even Apple is not without it’s flaws. Lost in the outpouring of admiration for Steve is one very staunch reality:  the majority of Apple products are manufactured in China by Foxconn, a company that is known for significant human rights violations.

Of course, it’s also fitting that I’m writing this using my MacBrook Pro. Steve, you will be missed.

Nike+ – A Great Example of What Collaboration Can Accomplish

Today, I completed my longest run in about a year. Actually, it was my longest run since April 3rd, 2010 – when I ran 18.96km in 2 hours, 5 minutes and 29 seconds, at an average pace of 6 minutes and 37 seconds per kilometer.

How the heck do I know that? Well, I record my runs using the Nike+iPod sports kit, the ingenious collaboration between Nike and Apple that has benefited runners worldwide since its launch in 2006.

There are two main reasons why I marvel at Nike+:

1. An innovative product from a unique collaboration

I believe that over the coming years we are going to see more instances of companies – sometimes even competitors – joining forces in unique collaborations.  There are many potential benefits to be gained, including shared knowledge and data, shared resources, and opportunity to develop new and innovative products and services by leveraging and combining strengths.

2. It’s social and community-driven

The Nike+ experience extends well beyond the runs, thanks to a fantastic website and online community that has been cultivated. Not only can Nike+ users record and track runs using the website, they can share their experiences with runners worldwide while also benefiting from some rich content – including a training tips blog.

Recently, Nike+ also added a “Challenges” section, through which individual users can create running challenges and invite community members to participate. Sample challenges include “365 miles in 2011”, in which all participants are challenged to run 365 miles, and “Fastest 5km in 2011”. Each challenge includes a leader board, adding some incentive for participants to compete against one another.

Three Poignant Stories from Steve Jobs

It’s no secret that Steve Jobs, Apple’s Co-founder and CEO, has achieved remarkable success in his career. I came across this video of his 2005 Stanford Commencement Address on TED, and I thought I would post it here. In the video, Steve shares how his path to success was far from linear. If you can spare fifteen minutes, I highly recommend watching the video, it’s quite inspirational.


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